abjure


abjure
abjure, renounce, forswear, recant, retract are synonymous when they mean to abandon irrevocably and, usually, with solemnity or publicity. Except in the extended senses of abjure, renounce, and forswear they all imply the recall of one’s word.
Abjure and renounce are scarcely distinguishable when they imply solemn repudiation as of an oath or vow
{

he shall, before he is admitted to citizenship, declare on oath in open court that he . . . absolutely and entirely renounces and abjures all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty— U. S. Code

}
In their extended senses, however, abjure distinctively suggests deliberate rejection or avoidance while renounce specifically connotes disclaiming or disowning
{

abjure force

}
{

renounce one’s principles

}
{

if a man is content to abjure wealth and to forego marriage, to live simply without luxuries, he may spend a very dignified gentle life here— Benson

}
{

he was later to renounce impressionism and to quarrel with most of the impressionists— Ready

}
Forswear often adds to abjure (especially in the reflexive use of the verb or in the participial adjective forsworn) the suggestion of perjury or of culpable violation of a solemn engagement
{

I have sworn to obey the laws, and I cannot forswear myself— Blackie

}
It often means little more than to swear off
{

Mr. Dulles grants by implication that the Peking regime is the government of China. He insists that it forswear the use of force in advancing its ambitions— New Republic

}
Recant and retract stress the withdrawal of something professed or declared; recant always and retract often imply admission of error. One recants, however, something that one has openly professed or taught, as religious or scientific doctrines; one retracts something one has written or spoken, as a charge, a promise, an order
{

if Christians recanted they were to be spared, but . . . if they persisted in their faith they were to be executed— Latourettey

}
{

a word informs your brother I retract this morning’s offer— Browningy

}
Analogous words: *forgo, forbear, eschew: abstain, *refrain: reject, repudiate, spurn (see DECLINE): abandon, *relinquish
Antonyms: pledge (allegiance, a vow): elect (a way of life, a means to an end, an end)
Contrasted words: plight, engage (see PROMISE): *choose, select, opt: own, avow, *acknowledge

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Abjure — Ab*jure , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Abjured}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Abjuring}.] [L. abjurare to deny upon oath; ab + jurare to swear, fr. jus, juris, right, law; cf. F. abjurer. See {Jury}.] 1. To renounce upon oath; to forswear; to disavow; as, to abjure… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • abjure — abjure, adjure Abjure means ‘to renounce on oath’ • (He had abjured, he thought, all superstitions Iris Murdoch, 1985) and to abjure one s country (or realm) is to swear to abandon it for ever. It is also used in the weakened sense ‘to renounce’… …   Modern English usage

  • abjure — ab·jure /ab ju̇r, əb / vt ab·jured, ab·jur·ing [Latin abjurare, from ab off + jurare to swear]: renounce; specif: to disclaim formally or renounce upon oath solemnly abjure s his allegiance to his former country ab·ju·ra·tion /ˌab jə rā shən/ …   Law dictionary

  • abjuré — abjuré, ée (ab ju ré, ée) part. passé. Le calvinisme abjuré par Henri IV. De vieilles haines, depuis longtemps abjurées …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • Abjure — Ab*jure , v. i. To renounce on oath. Bp. Burnet. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • abjure — (v.) early 15c., from M.Fr. abjurer or directly from L. abjurare deny on oath, from ab away (see AB (Cf. ab )) + jurare to swear, related to jus (gen. juris) law (see JURIST (Cf. jurist)). Related …   Etymology dictionary

  • abjure — [v] give up abstain from, forswear, recant, renege, renounce, retract, take back, withdraw; concepts 30,54,195 …   New thesaurus

  • abjuré — Abjuré, [abjur]ée. part. Il a les significations de son verbe …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • abjure — ► VERB formal ▪ swear to give up (a belief or claim). DERIVATIVES abjuration noun. ORIGIN Latin abjurare, from jurare swear …   English terms dictionary

  • abjure — [ab joor′, əbjoor′] vt. abjured, abjuring [ME abjuren < L abjurare < ab , from, away + jurare, to swear: see JURY1] 1. to give up (rights, allegiance, etc.) under oath; renounce 2. to give up (opinions) publicly; recant abjuration [ab΄jə… …   English World dictionary


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.